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FEMI ZACCHEUS

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FEMI ZACCHEUS
By ATL Digital

Q: What are some streaming trends and behaviors you’ve seen occur and arise in the music industry during quarantine? Are there any unique opportunities for rising and established artists?
A: There’s been a few noticeable market shifts since quarantine started. One I find really interesting is that we’re seeing the time when people choose to listen to music change a bit. We used to see streams spike in the early morning/early evening hours when people are driving to and from work. Now when we look at those charts, the distribution of when people are listening to music is a lot more even throughout the day. Another interesting trend is the rise in live-streaming and virtual concerts. We’ve seen those live streams take on many different forms, but I think @torylanez’s “Quarantine Radio” livestreams are a really good example of how artists can continue to share their personalities and even build an entirely new audience during this time. Overall, I think quarantine presents a unique opportunity for experimentation in general, whether that’s live-streaming their day-to-day activities, taking fans behind the scenes of their creative process, or shooting an entire music video in their bedroom, like Kehlani’s “Toxic” video. Given the realities of the situation, fans are more accepting than ever of a DIY look and feel to music… @drakeotheruler actually just put out an entire album where he recorded all his vocals over the phone… and it sounds amazing!

Q: You first started off at WEA in Research and Analysis. What drew you into data, and what challenges and surprises do you face when creating a story out of data?
A: I’ve always been really interested in using data to solve problems, even back to my time as an Economics major at UNC Chapel-Hill I was always thinking about ways I could marry my interest in data with music. Working at WEA in Research + Analysis was the perfect training ground for that because I was able to learn from some really smart people the skills and tools to analyze and present data while also getting to work on longer term projects about macro-trends in music. One of the things that I find most interesting/challenging things about music and data is that music is one of the hardest things to quantify – How much is someone enjoying a song for example? Is that measured by how many times they stream it? How many people they share it with? Whether they add it to a playlist? The answers to these questions can be elusive but definitely keep me engaged and on the lookout for new ways to interpret how fans are listening to music.

Q: What are some new young international Black artists you want to see break? What do you think it will take to break Afrobeats into mainstream?
A: There are so, so many young black artists in the US and abroad that I’d love to see break… @burnaboygram out of Nigeria, @kojeyradical out of the UK and AYLØ, out of Nigeria immediately come to mind. I think it’s only a matter of time before Afrobeats breaks into the mainstream but I think one thing that will probably happen first is that as other genres like Pop and Hip-Hop continue to add elements of Afrobeats, and Afrobeats collaborators to their music that will be a natural touchpoint for fans to get familiar with the sounds, voices, and personalities of Afrobeat and it’s popularity will naturally grow from their over time.

  • Three Questions with Femi Zaccheus, Junior Manger Sales & Streaming
    All Access
on September 10, 2020 - 7:17pm

Q: What are some streaming trends and behaviors you’ve seen occur and arise in the music industry during quarantine? Are there any unique opportunities for rising and established artists?
A: There’s been a few noticeable market shifts since quarantine started. One I find really interesting is that we’re seeing the time when people choose to listen to music change a bit. We used to see streams spike in the early morning/early evening hours when people are driving to and from work. Now when we look at those charts, the distribution of when people are listening to music is a lot more even throughout the day. Another interesting trend is the rise in live-streaming and virtual concerts. We’ve seen those live streams take on many different forms, but I think @torylanez’s “Quarantine Radio” livestreams are a really good example of how artists can continue to share their personalities and even build an entirely new audience during this time. Overall, I think quarantine presents a unique opportunity for experimentation in general, whether that’s live-streaming their day-to-day activities, taking fans behind the scenes of their creative process, or shooting an entire music video in their bedroom, like Kehlani’s “Toxic” video. Given the realities of the situation, fans are more accepting than ever of a DIY look and feel to music… @drakeotheruler actually just put out an entire album where he recorded all his vocals over the phone… and it sounds amazing!

Q: You first started off at WEA in Research and Analysis. What drew you into data, and what challenges and surprises do you face when creating a story out of data?
A: I’ve always been really interested in using data to solve problems, even back to my time as an Economics major at UNC Chapel-Hill I was always thinking about ways I could marry my interest in data with music. Working at WEA in Research + Analysis was the perfect training ground for that because I was able to learn from some really smart people the skills and tools to analyze and present data while also getting to work on longer term projects about macro-trends in music. One of the things that I find most interesting/challenging things about music and data is that music is one of the hardest things to quantify – How much is someone enjoying a song for example? Is that measured by how many times they stream it? How many people they share it with? Whether they add it to a playlist? The answers to these questions can be elusive but definitely keep me engaged and on the lookout for new ways to interpret how fans are listening to music.

Q: What are some new young international Black artists you want to see break? What do you think it will take to break Afrobeats into mainstream?
A: There are so, so many young black artists in the US and abroad that I’d love to see break… @burnaboygram out of Nigeria, @kojeyradical out of the UK and AYLØ, out of Nigeria immediately come to mind. I think it’s only a matter of time before Afrobeats breaks into the mainstream but I think one thing that will probably happen first is that as other genres like Pop and Hip-Hop continue to add elements of Afrobeats, and Afrobeats collaborators to their music that will be a natural touchpoint for fans to get familiar with the sounds, voices, and personalities of Afrobeat and it’s popularity will naturally grow from their over time.

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